Difference between revisions of "Description AC3-10"

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{{AC|front=AC 3-10|description=Description_AC3-10|testdata=Test Data_AC3-10|cfdsimulations=CFD Simulations_AC3-10|evaluation=Evaluation_AC3-10|qualityreview=Quality Review_AC3-10|bestpractice=Best Practice Advice_AC3-10|relatedUFRs=Related UFRs_AC3-10}}
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='''Combining/dividing flow in Y junction'''=
 
='''Combining/dividing flow in Y junction'''=
  
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Site Design and Implementation: [[Atkins]] and [[UniS]]
 
Site Design and Implementation: [[Atkins]] and [[UniS]]
 
 
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{{AC|front=AC 3-10|description=Description_AC3-10|testdata=Test Data_AC3-10|cfdsimulations=CFD Simulations_AC3-10|evaluation=Evaluation_AC3-10|qualityreview=Quality Review_AC3-10|bestpractice=Best Practice Advice_AC3-10|relatedUFRs=Related UFRs_AC3-10}}

Revision as of 10:20, 19 March 2009

Front Page

Description

Test Data

CFD Simulations

Evaluation

Best Practice Advice

Combining/dividing flow in Y junction

Application Challenge 3-10 © copyright ERCOFTAC 2004


Introduction

This application challenge focuses on the prediction of pressure losses and head loss coefficients for water flowing in a ‘Y’ junction. A series of tests has been carried out under both convergent and divergent flow conditions, and at various splits of flow in the two minor branches. The flow rates used in the major branch covered an approximate Reynolds number range of 5x105 to 1.2x106.

The ‘Y’ junction has an included angle of 50 degrees between the two minor branches, and the internal geometry has been optimised.


Relevance to Industrial Sector

Flow behaviour in pipe junctions is relevant to many industrial applications. At certain flow rate ratios the pressures in the ‘Y’ junction give rise to ‘negative’ differential pressures. CFD can provide an insight into the reasons behind this.


Design or Assessment Parameters

In this application challenge the design or assessment parameters DOAPs, are the differential pressures between the legs of the ‘Y’ junction.


Flow Domain Geometry

The flow geometry is shown in Figures 1 to 5.


Flow Physics and Fluid Dynamics Data

The flow is turbulent, weakly compressible, and isothermal. The Reynolds number in the major pipe branch ranges from 5x105 to 1.2x106. The fluid dynamics data (except boundary conditions) which are necessary in order to set up a CFD simulation are specified below:


The water density is calculated from the equation:

ωw = 1.0012 x (1000.25 – 0.008t – 0.004t2 + 0.46x10-6P) (1)


The water viscosity is calculated from the equation:

ln ωw = (484.1 / (120.57 + t)) – 10.35 (2)



Reynolds numbers are based on the diameter of branch 1 (with the combined flow rates) and are defined as:

ReD = ωw v1 D1 / ωw (3)


© copyright ERCOFTAC 2004


Contributors: Alan Stevens - Rolls-Royce Marine Power, Engineering & Technology Division

Site Design and Implementation: Atkins and UniS


Front Page

Description

Test Data

CFD Simulations

Evaluation

Best Practice Advice